About

Dog training involves teaching the human end of the leash as well as the dog end.

Joyce Biethan's Dogs Most good family dogs thrive in an environment where there are clear rules and direction. Otherwise, many dogs end up doing what comes naturally. And often what comes naturally for a dog isn’t acceptable within the human family group.

In our dog training we emphasize leadership, not dominance. These two concepts have very different meanings, and are too often lumped together. We see no place for dominance when training dogs.

Joyce believes that dog training involves teaching the human end of the leash as well as the dog end. Most good family dogs thrive in an environment where there are clear rules and direction. Otherwise, many dogs end up doing what comes naturally. And often what comes naturally for a dog isn’t acceptable within the human family group.


Meet Joyce


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Training dogs in the Northwest for over 17 years

three dogsJoyce Biethan MPT, CPDT, CNWI is the owner and CEO of Joyce’s Dogs. She has a 17 year history of providing a wide range of canine training services to house pets and competition dogs. In 2001 she left her 25 year career as a Physical Therapist to pursue full-time her passion for training both ends of the leash, full-time.

In late 2009 Joyce was introduced to the sport of K9 Nose Work and her intrigue quickly turned into a passion.  In January 2011 she became a  Certified Nose Work Instructor [CNWI].  Joyce spends a minimum of 10 days a year in continuing education course work.  She views this as essential to keep up to date with the advancing science of canine behavior, and of scent detection for the non-professional detection dog.

Joyce has owned mixed breeds, sporting, toy and herding dogs. Here is what she has to say about her current as well as her passed pack members:

  • Mick, a dog I adopted from a friend at 20 months, has been a dream dog.  A Border Collie/Aussie cross, Mick holds advanced titles in AKC and UKC Obedience, Rally, Agility, flyball and of course K9 Nose Work!  At 16 years of age, he still plays at Nose Work, and chases tennis balls, returning them if Split doesn’t get them first!
  • Split was found 2 miles from my house in 2011.  She humored Rider enough to get him to play with her.  Unclaimed in spite of my search for an owner, she became a keeper.

The following dogs are sadly gone now, but not forgotten.

3 months after Split came into our pack, I lost Rider to Lymphoma.

  • Rider, my second Belgian Sheepdog was eight when I lost him to lymphoma three weeks after a routine yearly check up detected his cancer, and three months after he finally had his playmate Split. Rider taught me more about dog training than I ever thought I needed to know! He led me to believe the best continuing education for a dog trainer should include living with and training a difficult dog. He was dog aggressive and as an adolescent an adult never had a playmate till Split came into his life.
  • Simon, a Silky Terrier found by a friend of mine, ended up in my household in Feb ’07. Simon was the other end of the bell shaped curve of dog behavior from Rider. I always think of Simon as a dog that didn’t know anything because he didn’t need to. He was inherently polite, and naturally followed the rules of the household. Never demanding without a good reason, he was great at communication his needs. And he was happiest ‘jobless’ just a hanging out dog.

I shared my life with two other dogs in the past. Ashley was a yearling Golden Retriever when she came to live with me. My first competition dog, we went from AKC Novice A to UDX in 11 months and earned six Dog World Awards during the 4 years we were together. Sadly, Ashley died suddenly of Cancer before her 5th birthday and 4 weeks after she retired from obedience competition.

My first Belgian Sheepdog, Echo, had multiple and rare medical issues that finely took his life at just over 6 years of age.

Thanks so much for taking the time to investigate Joyce’s Dogs

 


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